Politics

House set to tackle Israel weapons pause, aviation measures this week

House GOP leadership has a chance to spotlight Democratic divides over Israel this week with a bill that will force lawmakers to take a position on the Biden administration’s weapons pause to the ally.

The vote is expected to split Democrats, exposing divisions between those who fully back Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s actions in Gaza, and those who support a cease-fire and oppose further military aid to Israel.

The measure calls on the Biden administration to “proceed quickly” with previously green-lit arms transfers and requires the administration to “utilize all congressionally appropriated funds for security assistance for Israel as Congress intended.”

More than a messaging bill: The measure has substantive provisions limiting what can be done with funds appropriated by Congress to the Pentagon and State Department.

GOP members are expected to widely support the condemnation of the Biden administration’s weapons pause.

Republicans benefit from any opportunity to divide Democrats in an election year. But keep in mind: The legislation has bleak chances in the Senate.

Also, aviation: Also on the House’s agenda this week is the Senate-passed, five-year, $105 billion bill that will reauthorize the FAA. Votes on both the Israel and aviation measures are expected Wednesday.

Election watch: What we’re keeping an eye on this Election Day

Maryland’s Democratic primary for Senate, where it’s a fight between Rep. David Trone and Angela Alsobrooks to replace retiring Sen. Ben Cardin. The winner’s prize will be facing former Gov. Larry Hogan in the general election. 
The race to replace retiring Maryland Rep. John Sarbanes in the 3rd District pits activist and former Capitol Police officer Harry Dunn against state Sen. Sarah Elfreth, who has the support of AIPAC’s super PAC.
West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice is favored to win the GOP Senate nomination, which sets him up to replace retiring Democrat Joe Manchin. 
CORRECTION: A previous version of this report misstated Benjamin Netanyahu’s title. He is the Israeli prime minister.House GOP leadership has a chance to spotlight Democratic divides over Israel this week with a bill that will force lawmakers to take a position on the Biden administration’s weapons pause to the ally.
The vote is expected to split Democrats, exposing divisions between those who fully back Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s actions in Gaza, and those who support a cease-fire and oppose further military aid to Israel.
The measure calls on the Biden administration to “proceed quickly” with previously green-lit arms transfers and requires the administration to “utilize all congressionally appropriated funds for security assistance for Israel as Congress intended.”
More than a messaging bill: The measure has substantive provisions limiting what can be done with funds appropriated by Congress to the Pentagon and State Department.
GOP members are expected to widely support the condemnation of the Biden administration’s weapons pause.
Republicans benefit from any opportunity to divide Democrats in an election year. But keep in mind: The legislation has bleak chances in the Senate.
Also, aviation: Also on the House’s agenda this week is the Senate-passed, five-year, $105 billion bill that will reauthorize the FAA. Votes on both the Israel and aviation measures are expected Wednesday.
Election watch: What we’re keeping an eye on this Election Day

Maryland’s Democratic primary for Senate, where it’s a fight between Rep. David Trone and Angela Alsobrooks to replace retiring Sen. Ben Cardin. The winner’s prize will be facing former Gov. Larry Hogan in the general election. 
The race to replace retiring Maryland Rep. John Sarbanes in the 3rd District pits activist and former Capitol Police officer Harry Dunn against state Sen. Sarah Elfreth, who has the support of AIPAC’s super PAC.
West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice is favored to win the GOP Senate nomination, which sets him up to replace retiring Democrat Joe Manchin. 
CORRECTION: A previous version of this report misstated Benjamin Netanyahu’s title. He is the Israeli prime minister.  

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