Politics

Jordan tries, tries again to win votes for speaker on second ballot

Voting for who will be speaker enters its second day, where Jim Jordan will be tested Wednesday morning on just how many Republican critics he has convinced.

The House is expected to begin voting at 11 a.m. The chamber recessed after Jordan lost on the first ballot Tuesday and did not return for further action on selecting a speaker, punting the second ballot to Wednesday.

Jordan and his allies used the time to try and convince some of the 20 Republicans who voted against him to support him on the next ballot. Jordan spoke to POLITICO Tuesday night, saying he has flipped some of those 20 opponents within his party, but declining to say how many.

When asked if he felt confident he will win the gavel on Wednesday, Jordan told POLITICO simply: “I do.”

While Jordan may have gained some supporters, others were only committed to backing him on the first ballot. That means this morning it’s possible Jordan could lose rather than gain support. That could derail his pursuit of the speakership, killing momentum and causing more Republicans to step away.

Strong Jordan backer Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) said he doesn’t think the second ballot will decide it, but that Jordan will eventually prevail.

“We know who will be coming over to Jordan’s side on the next round. What we don’t know is who might go the other way,” said Massie.

While Jordan and allies made calls late into Tuesday night and will continue Wednesday morning, they aren’t expecting a full GOP conference meeting before the second ballot.

“In terms of the whole conference, sometimes that turns into people yelling at each other. And that kind of undoes some of the progress,” Jordan ally Rep. Warren Davidson (R-Ohio) told POLITICO. “I think at this point, let’s just keep working with the individuals in small groups that are still looking to find a way to say yes.”

Voting for who will be speaker enters its second day, where Jim Jordan will be tested Wednesday morning on just how many Republican critics he has convinced.
The House is expected to begin voting at 11 a.m. The chamber recessed after Jordan lost on the first ballot Tuesday and did not return for further action on selecting a speaker, punting the second ballot to Wednesday.
Jordan and his allies used the time to try and convince some of the 20 Republicans who voted against him to support him on the next ballot. Jordan spoke to POLITICO Tuesday night, saying he has flipped some of those 20 opponents within his party, but declining to say how many.
When asked if he felt confident he will win the gavel on Wednesday, Jordan told POLITICO simply: “I do.”
While Jordan may have gained some supporters, others were only committed to backing him on the first ballot. That means this morning it’s possible Jordan could lose rather than gain support. That could derail his pursuit of the speakership, killing momentum and causing more Republicans to step away.
Strong Jordan backer Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) said he doesn’t think the second ballot will decide it, but that Jordan will eventually prevail.
“We know who will be coming over to Jordan’s side on the next round. What we don’t know is who might go the other way,” said Massie.
While Jordan and allies made calls late into Tuesday night and will continue Wednesday morning, they aren’t expecting a full GOP conference meeting before the second ballot.
“In terms of the whole conference, sometimes that turns into people yelling at each other. And that kind of undoes some of the progress,” Jordan ally Rep. Warren Davidson (R-Ohio) told POLITICO. “I think at this point, let’s just keep working with the individuals in small groups that are still looking to find a way to say yes.”  

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